This six session interactive online program that will make sure you’re prepared to advocate effectively for your library. The program includes six webinars* as well as a series of online modules that participants can complete at their own pace.  Each webinar will take place from 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

 

Getting Started / Session 1 / Wednesday, January 8:

Determining your library’s advocacy goal.  To share recent national research on how voters and elected officials perceive the public library, and why they do or do not support it.

Goals:
•    Learn why people support the public library — and what would make them support it even more
•    Discuss how to use this research to refine your Advocacy Work Plan

Session 2 / Wednesday, January 15:

To further take the data presented last week in “Public Perceptions” and apply it to create your own library story.

Goals:
•    Create a compelling story about your library that excites supporters and turns that excitement into action
•    Help you develop and practice your public speaking skills so you can effectively tell your library’s story.

Session 3 / Wednesday, January 22:

To focus on your own leadership skills, and how (as noted in “Public Perceptions”) advocating on behalf of the library starts with the library leadership.

Goals:
•    Discuss the key impact of leadership in relationship to communication and advocacy
•    Review key concepts in managing an advocacy plan as well as the importance of team communication in meeting advocacy goals

Session 4 / Wednesday, January 29:

Building the network and relationships beyond yourself and your library in order to best leverage your resources and meet your advocacy goals.

Goals:
•    Determine who the key people and organizations in your community should be included in your library’s fundraising team
•    Identify how effective relationships and understanding “What’s In It For Them” can help with current and future advocacy efforts for your library

Session 5 / Wednesday, February 5:

To pull the previous weeks’ content together (creating the message, based upon data and stories, effective leadership communication skills, and leveraging teams and networks for advocacy) and focus on
how to effectively ask for public funds.

Goals:
•    Review (at a high-level) the ways that the requests for public funds are made within communities and who the “competition” is for these funds
•    Discuss some specific steps libraries can take to help make your public funding budget presentation more compelling
•    Explore the concept of “priorities” and how this impacts the library’s budget and request for public funds

Session 6 / Wednesday, February 12:

At this point you have created a solid Advocacy Work Plan based upon your established advocacy goal (“Getting Started” & Week 1). The purpose of Week 6 is to begin to put that plan into action and determine how to make your goals a reality.

Goals:
•    Assemble the final Advocacy Work Plan, based upon the previous five weeks’ thoughts and content
•    Determine strategies on how to implement and manage your Advocacy Work Plan in order to meet your Advocacy Goal

* Registration for the entire program is required.  Registration for individual program sessions is not available.

Turning the Page 2.0 is a program of the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association. The Turning the Page 2.0 logo and all related materials are used with permission from the Public Library Association.

Registration Info

Individual Registrations      
NYLA Members $135    
NON-Members $189    
       
Group Registrations*      
NYLA Members $395    
NON-Members $549    

* Group viewing registration is available if you plan to share the webinar with a group.
(Hook-up the LCD projector and share the program with a group of staff members!)

REGISTER ONLINE - CLICK HERE

About the Speaker


Libby Post, President of Communication Services. For almost a decade, Libby Post has been creating innovative advocacy campaigns for public libraries. With a success rate of 80%, Post has been a public library partner in creating library districts, and passing budgets, funding propositions and building referendums. She was chosen as one of a handful by the Public Library Association to keep the Turning the Page program going.