2009 Pied Piper Award

Scott Jarzombeck & Jamiee Meyer
Albany Public Library
161 Washington Ave
Albany, NY 12210
518-427-4300
www.albanypubliclibrary.org

PROGRAM NAME: 
Computer Camp

APPROXIMATE DURATION: 
2 sessions a summer, each session is 2 weeks. 
10 Day Session, Mon-Fri 
From 12:30 to 3:00 there are non technology related programs for camp attendees.

INTENDED AUDIENCE: 
27 children participated in the 2008 computer camp, 15 students in the first session and 12 in the second. 22 participants completed the program by attending all 10 days in a session. 13 students were Female and 14 male. The average age of participants was 11, the youngest student was 9 and the oldest was 13. 8 had attended previous APL computer camps, 5 of those students had taken part in the program more than 3 times. 

Based on census data (1999), the average household in the students based on zip code was 30,680 and the median household Income was 25,761.

2008 DEMOGRAPHIC: 
27 children participated in this year’s computer camp, 15 students in the first session and 12 in the second. 22 participants completed the program by attending all 10 days in a session. 13 students were Female and 14 male. The average age of participants was 11, the youngest student was 9 and the oldest was 13. 8 had attended previous APL computer camps, 5 of those students had taken part in the program more than 3 times. 

Based on census data (1999), the average household in the students based on zip code was 30,680 and the median household Income was 25,761.

PUBLICITY: 
2008 Camp was selected by the ALSC Children & Technology Committee as a great technology program for children. It was part of their presentation at the 2008 ALA Conference and is a part of their Wiki of children’s programs. 

Part of the NYLA Presentation “You Showed Us the Money” as an outstanding program that used Gates Grant money for programming. 

*Program is mentioned, and photos from camp are featured, in the upcoming article “Tots to Tweens: Age Appropriate Technology Programs for Kids” in the upcoming winter addition of Children and Libraries. 

Past programs have been featured in local news segments and in the Times Union (A Hearst Publication). 

*This was added after physical copies were sent out. 

Computer Camp 2008 Flier

SUPPLIES NEEDED: 
12 PC’s, Adobe Photoshop Elements, video camera, audio recording equipment and an account with blogger.com

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:
Computer Camp was started in 1999 at the Howe Branch of the Albany Public Library by Library Assistant Linda Mallory Mitchell and community volunteer Bill Alexander. In 2000 Howe’s Librarian, Scott Jarzombek, took over the instructional component of the program, creating a curriculum based around basic web design. In 2006 the program expanded, including a camp session at the Main Library. 

Albany Public Libraries Computer Camp is designed to provide an educational and entertaining experience for children. The program helps children learn how to start their own blog, Internet searching, Web 2.0 concepts, Internet safety and develop an understanding of how the digital world impacts their lives. Upon completion of camp participants receive a shirt and APL branded flash drive with all their work.

Uploaded File: YSS-piedpiperwinner2009.gif

Bibliotech (Library Newsletter) Article: 
Albany Public Library's Computer Camp finished its first session on July 18th. The annual program is designed to teach city youth about the inner workings of the internet and the tools that help create content for the World Wide Web. This year's curriculum focused on Web 2.0 concepts; animated images, blogging, pod and video casting. 

"Computer Camp rocked this year," exclaimed Freddy Boeher who enjoyed his second year attending the program, "we learned about Blogging and we embedded maps from Google." Children's Librarian Jamie Myer scheduled varies activities outside the lab, including a visit to Albany's Institute of History and Art and a visit from Roses' Delaware Dogs. "They told us how the dogs were trained and showed us how they did tricks, it was really interesting," explained Nadja (?). Campers were also responsible for a 6 minute movie about literacy zombies who roam the library looking for good books. 

"It's always exciting to see kids go from consumers to creators, they begin to realize that the real purpose of the internet is for communication and creation," explained librarian and camp instructor Scott Jarzombek, "libraries can play an important role in educating the public in these emerging technologies." This year’s camp was not possible without funding from The Standish Family and a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. 

You can listen, watch, and read about the camp from the kids themselves at aplcomputercamp2008.blogspot.com.

INTENDED OUTCOME: 
The intended outcome is for participants to have a better understand of the World Wide Web and Web 2.0 concepts. Students will have learned how to create a blog, comment on a blog, edit photos using Adobe Photoshop Elements, create animated GIF files, post those images in a blog post, use tools like Google Maps, create a podcast and create a video cast. 

Students were also instructed on the appropriate way to do a web search, evaluate a website, and find information by using a specific website.

HOW WILL OUTCOMES BE MEASURED: 
At the end of the program students will have an active blog which features posts about what they learned that day and its practical application in their life. Students will also fill out work sheets related to web quest. 

The blog is online and can be found at this address:http://aplcomputercamp2008.blogspot.com/